Rebecca’s garden is indeed a sweet space

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I was impressed by the size of this hydrangea. Rebecca is planning to remove her front lawnette. I'm fond of a bit of lawn, but in California, I can see why she might want remove it.

I was impressed by the size of this hydrangea. Rebecca is planning to remove her front, circular lawnette just beyond the hydrangea. I’m fond of a bit of lawn, but in California, I can see why she might want remove it.

There is nothing like visiting the garden of a friend, especially when that friend is one you don’t get to hang out with all the time. It was a thrill to finally see Rebecca Sweet’s garden a couple of weeks ago while at Garden Bloggers’ Fling in San Francisco. I’ve been traveling for two weeks, and I didn’t take my laptop with me to Fling. I decided just to use my ipad. It worked for everything except posting on the blog. I have a complicated password to the blog’s dashboard, and I’d forgotten it. Ah, life in 2013.

Little touches abound throughout Rebecca's garden. I love how she groups similar things.

Little touches abound throughout Rebecca’s garden. I love how she groups similar things.

I’ve tried all morning to remember when Rebecca Sweet went from being an online acquaintance to a friend I’ve had coffee with, and to someone I trust when I have a question about gardening in the middle of California. When we finally met in person a couple of years ago, I felt like we’d known each other forever.

A window box filled with succulent offerings. People in Oklahoma could learn from this. Water hungry plants have no place in a hanging pot.

A window box filled with succulent offerings. People in Oklahoma could learn from this. Water hungry plants have no place in a hanging pot here or in California.

It was a joy to see her lovely home, meet her husband and check out all of her special touches throughout her back and front gardens. I so like the word garden better than yard, don’t you?

Rebecca's office. I love the cabin-style windows that open outward.

Rebecca’s office. I love the cabin-style windows that open outward.

Rebecca has a small garden space within which to work, and her story of how her childhood home became her current one is fascinating. She has an office I found myself coveting. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a space where I could be alone and write? Good grief, what am I thinking? I still have two children at home full-time, along with a college student home this summer. There is nowhere I can hide.

Just kidding. Sorta.

Inside Rebecca's office

Inside Rebecca’s office

So, here in photos is Rebecca’s garden. It was so hot in California that day it felt like a bad-ass, Oklahoma summer day. I’m not kidding. By the time we reached Rebecca’s house, I was roasted, toasted and fried from the heat. After two weeks in California–where it eventually became cool–I’m finally back in my own state where it’s now hot too. Here, hot feels summer-normal, but I wish I could go back to Rebecca’s house, sit and have a cup of coffee with her in that shady space. Here, Jeannie Hanson and Victoria Summerley share a moment in the shade.

Jeannie and Victoria chatting on a bench. How they managed to look cool inspires me.

Jeannie and Victoria chatting on a bench. How they managed to look cool inspires me.

I must say as much as I enjoyed California’s middle section and even points north, there is no place like home. Just ask Rebecca.

About 

I'm a writer, born and raised in Oklahoma, and an obsessive gardener who attempts to grow over 90 rose bushes, along with daylilies and other perennials. I also grow some mean tomatoes, and I'm gluten and casein intolerant, hence the gluten free blogs.

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27 comments on “Rebecca’s garden is indeed a sweet space

  1. Linda Lehmusvirta

    Just saw this! Oh, you captured this enchanting garden so well. It was my favorite garden of all. And I’m so impressed with your gorgeous photographs, despite the heat.

  2. Vickie McDonough

    What a lovely garden! I’d like to know how she gets her hydrangeas to look so full and pretty. Mine are droopy.

  3. Donna@Gardens Eye View

    Dee I enjoyed your take on this lovely garden. It has been too hot here and tropical…our gardens do feel like home!

  4. Denise

    I love Helen’s candor! I can’t imagine my garden without that horrid spiky stuff, but viva la difference. Wonderful post, Dee.

  5. Robin L

    Wow, that office space is drool-worthy! I do have a hobby room all to myself, but it sure doesn’t look anything like that. I dearly love blue hydrangeas since my alkaline soil produces only pink. And a bush of that size? Wow, beautiful.

  6. Gail

    Sweet indeed! I surely missed a great garden this year…Thank you Dee for sharing Rebecca’s garden. Her office is delightful. gail

  7. Rose

    Love, love Rebecca’s office! I’ve been looking forward to reading some posts on this year’s Fling–sounds like you visited some amazing gardens.

  8. Rebecca Sweet

    Wow, Dee – and everyone – I am so, so flattered. I felt so awful that the heat was making everyone feel so ‘uncomfortable’ (understatement of the year) and am smiling ear to ear right now to hear that even so, you were still able to enjoy my little paradise. Oh, how I wish you could all come back right now and we could sit out on my patio (where its only 75 degrees with a slight breeze), sip margaritas and have a good, long chat. Hugs and kisses to everyone. And thank you again, Dee, for such a sweet post (with awsome photos, to boot!) XOXO – Rebecca

  9. Sue Ellen

    How wonderful to visit the garden of someone you met online and became friends with. I enjoy garden tours and go whenever I can. I have been going to regional daylily meetings for the last few years and they have allowed me to see a lot of different gardens. I usually come home with at least a few ideas of things I would like to try.

  10. Pam/Digging

    There’s nothing better than visiting a friend’s garden, unless it’s a friend who has exceptional taste and design sense, as Rebecca does. I loved her garden. And I’m envious that you’ve already gotten your first Fling post up. I keep trying today, but it just hasn’t happened yet.

  11. Helen at Toronto Gardens

    Rebecca’s garden was a general favourite, I think. But now I want to know the fascinating story of how her childhood home became her current one! Do tell.

  12. Phillip

    Beautiful garden and I love that office too. Thanks for introducing me to a new blog too. Don’t you hate passwords?

  13. Marian St.Clair

    Sorry to miss the Fling again this year…too many summer-time commitments as usual. Glad to hear everyone had a great (though hot) time!

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  15. Jason

    It was nice to visit a garden that did not require fabulous wealth to establish or maintain. Very family friendly and beautiful it was.

  16. Alison

    It was a lovely garden, and I really wish it had been a cooler day. I was fried too. I think we all practically lined up to get that exact same shot of the interior of her wonderful shed/office.

    1. Dee Nash

      I’m sure we did too. Wasn’t it simply lovely? I think many of us took the same shots. The garden isn’t super large, and we were all very hot and tired. One day, I’d like to go back and spend some time really looking.~~Dee

  17. karen

    Her garden is proof you don’t need a ton of space to create something beautiful! It sounds like you had a fantastic two weeks away!

    1. Dee Nash

      So true Karen. So true.

  18. Leslie

    I loved her garden also…it really was a beautiful spot.

    1. Dee Nash

      Yes, just like her personality. I’m so glad we got to visit it together.

  19. Layanee

    This garden is truly a respite from the outside world. It even felt cool there on that hot day. Perhaps it was the watermelon, the garden and the company which overshadowed the oppressive heat. Your words brought back a delightful memory.

    1. Dee Nash

      It did. One of the coolest gardens we visited that day.~~Dee

  20. Helen

    Rebecca’s garden was the one I felt most at home in. I suppose it was the lawn and perennial planting and none of that horrid spiky stuff we were to see the next day.

    1. Dee Nash

      No spikes!!!

    2. Jason

      Wow, I would never have the guts to refer to those succulents as “horrid spiky stuff”. Too scared they’ll come and poke at me with their spikes. I just tell myself I can appreciate them as long as they are not in my own garden.

      1. Loree/danger garden

        I’m going to ignore these comments disparaging spikes because I like you both (Dee and Helen) and want to keep on liking you…