Nutmeg Breakfast Muffins

Post to Twitter

0362.JPGThe page was mottled and creased from use, but over a year ago, I’d closed the book on one of my favorite recipes after being diagnosed gluten and casein intolerant. This morning, with time on my hands (since we’re attending mass tonight with the our trappers) and a rumble in my tummy, I decided to pull out my copy of The Breakfast Book, by Marion Cunningham and try to adapt one of the recipes so I could eat it. When my daughters each ate two, I knew I’d succeeded, so I decided to share it with you.

GFCF Nutmeg Muffins

2 cups of gluten free flour mix (I used the one from Gluten-Free Baking Classics)

3/4 cup sugar

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 1/2 whole nutmegs, grated*

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon xantham gum

2 eggs

7 tablespoons Earth Balance Baking Sticks, melted

1 cup unsweetened almond milk

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Grease muffin tins. Mix together dry ingredients. Note: you do need to grate the nutmegs to get the true flavor. Nutmegs aren’t difficult to grate. They look hard, but are actually very soft inside. I use a small grater I have, or you can use a rasp. Beat the eggs and then stir in the melted buttery sticks and the almond milk.

Stir the dry and wet ingredients together. Pour into muffin tins. Bake for approx. 20 minutes until the rounded tops are golden brown. They looked a little like cornbread muffins. Remove muffins and serve warm.

Note: Gluten free goodies dry out quickly so store any uneaten muffins in the freezer. I use ziploc bags so that I can reach in and grab them one at a time. Enjoy.

Enjoy.For those of you who can eat glutinous goodies, here’s where you can find the book. Marion Cunningham wrote The Fannie Farmer Cookbook: Anniversaryin the 1980s. She also wrote several other cookbooks. I like them for their fresh and unusual ingredients. I’m thinking about adapting the fig muffins next time. If I do, and they’re good, I’ll let you know.

 

About 

I'm a writer, born and raised in Oklahoma, and an obsessive gardener who attempts to grow over 90 rose bushes, along with daylilies and other perennials. I also grow some mean tomatoes, and I'm gluten and casein intolerant, hence the gluten free blogs.

    Find more about me on:
  • facebook
  • googleplus
  • twitter
spacer

8 comments on “Nutmeg Breakfast Muffins

  1. CurtissAnn

    The muffins sound divine…the almond milk very attractive! You know I like to have something to go with tea. What a beautiful picture!

    Love,
    CurtissAnn

  2. Annie in Austin

    Just a little sprinkle of nutmeg is aromatic – 2 whole nutmegs? These muffins sound like like edible aromatherapy. How wise of you to rework the recipe instead of feeling deprived, Dee.

    I just watched an episode of a BBC horticultural mystery series “Rosemary & Thyme”… it was set in an allotment garden and the video image popped into my mind when UKDee talked about her allotment garden. They sound quite different from the community plots found in the US, don’t they?

    Annie at the Transplantable Rose

  3. Curtis

    Hi dee, The muffins look good. Will have to bookmark your page and come back to it later to try this recipe.

  4. Mary Ann

    Hi Red Dirt Rambler,

    I don’t really have to worry about the GFCF but all that there heady nutmeg said “TRY ME” so I am goin after it. I bet the kitchen smelled out of this world!

    MA, email me if you want the glutinous version of the recipe. It does make your whole house smell like home.~~Dee

  5. The Park Wife

    Your arbors are exquisite, truly beautiful.

    I am cold so all I really want to cook right now is chili or soup, but I am going to save this recipe.

    Take Care,
    The Park Wife

    PW2, we are having chili tonight so I know exactly what you mean.~~Dee

  6. leslie

    thanks for visiting my site. The muffins look great. I will have to give the recipe a try!

    Leslie, you’re welcome and the same back attcha. I hope you try it. It was good!!~~Dee

  7. dee

    Hi Dee, thanks for stopping by my site.
    I rent my allotment from my local council, there are 90 plots at the site and mine measures around 250 square meters or 300 square yards, which we call a ten rod plot some of the gardeners have a half plot (5 rod). My plot has not been cultivated for seven years and was pretty much abandoned and overgrown so I’m in the process of cutting it down and clearing all the rubbish.I have fruit trees and bushes planted and grew some veg last year on the parts i cleared, i still have around half of it to clear. The weathers not helping as its rained almost every day here for weeks :(
    Some council allotment sites allow you to keep chickens,sadly not mine but i am allowed to keep bees if i want.Some of my gardening neighbours have bee hives. Oh iv rattled on a bit, ill be back to have a wander round your site soon
    Dee

    Thank you for the explanation. I never really understood the allotment idea. I think it’s a good one though, especially for urban areas where parking lots would otherwise be. It sounds like it will really be beautiful once you get some more of the rubbish hauled away. I’ll keep coming by and checking your progress.~~Dee

  8. risingrainbow

    I have a friend who must live gluetin free. I’m going to pass this on to her. Thanks a bunch.

    Thank you. I’m going to try to post more recipes as I make them because cooking and gardening are kind of what I do, along with writing of course.~~Dee